Public Lecture: Giorgos Triantafyllou

TRAILS OF READING
ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND ARTISTIC EPISODES _THE CONCEPT OF “POETIC TIME”
IN ARCHITECTURE

Tuesday April, 2, 2019_ 19:00 _ Lecture Room 301

Abstract

The subject of this lecture focuses on four diverse cases of unique architectural, artistic and archaeological chapters whose common characteristics relate to the trails created and time to assimilate.
Clearly demarcated, these paths are characterized by their slight elevation, sufficient length, width variations and low-pitched break sections which integrate seamlessly into space. Their aim is to extend the “poetic reading time” introducing a different spiritual and emotional perspective.
The projects in this presentation, will show how architecture and art interact in different ways, both in the present and past, traditional or architectural spaces and in nature itself.
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Short bio

Born in Athens in 1951, Giorgos Triantafyllou studied Architecture in Thessaloniki before founding his own firm “Giorgos Triantafyllou and Partners” in 1981. His work focuses on interiors, restorations, enhancement of archaeological sites and large scale complexes related to tourism, industrial facilities and spaces of culture.

He has received distinctions in architectural competitions and his work, articles and scientific papers have been published in Greece and internationally. He has delivered public lectures on architecture and art and has taught courses as part of postgraduate programs.

He loves photography and art and has collaborated with artists, as a co-creator, for the realization of architectural and artistic interventions in Greece and abroad. He has also published works and articles, as well as a series of photographs, in publications and exhibitions as well as on his personal blog (http://triantafylloug.blogspot.com), that he has been keeping for the past 10 years.

His book titled “archetypes from huts and sheepfolds to contemporary art and architecture” and the exhibition held in the Byzantine and Christian Museum of Athens in 2010, reveal an unexplored and despised genuine architecture that associates it with works of international art and architecture, opening new roads for the future.