Aristotelis Dimitrakopoulos “Eutectonics: Groundless and Disintelligible”

 

 

Aristotelis Dimitrakopoulos is an Associate Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at the Department of Architecture, University of Ioannina, Greece. Aristotelis [born: Athens GR, 1974] graduated in 1998 as an Architect-Engineer [Professional Dipl. Arch. Eng.] from the National Technical University of Athens School of Architecture and earned his Master of Architecture degree from the Yale University School of Architecture [2000]. Aristotelis has worked in New York City for Robert A.M. Stern Architects [2000-01] and Bernard Tschumi Architects [2001-02] in major implemented projects prior to founding of Aristotheke Eutectonics© Office of Architecture + Urban Design in Athens, Greece. He has taught at the University of Patras GR, the Savannah College of Art & Design, School of Building Arts in Savannah Georgia, and at Frederick University in Nicosia, Cyprus. Aristotelis has written extensively in English and Greek on diverse topics in urbanism and architecture under historical, theoretical and critical scopes and has served as member in editorial boards for several sector periodicals in Athens, GR. His design work is frequently included in collective, peer-reviewed, regional architectural exhibitions.

The lecture unveils a specific segment of design production by Aristotheke Eutectonics emphasizing smallness and exploring domesticity. The ‘framework’ is dual: belongs either to a realm of pragmatism or to pure phantasm, oftentimes merging the two. The term “disintelligible” is introduced as to signify a key notion of the contemporary at a nodal stage characterized by populism in the perception of architectural production en masse via the media. The “groundless” operates within a broad spectrum of design and theoretical agendas evading the gravitational and verticality, or circumventing rationalization at large.